In Memory Of
U.S. Navy Seaman Second Class
Darol Charles Brown
Fairburn, South Dakota
Pennington County
March 27, 1924 – April 12, 1945
Killed in Action at Okinawa aboard the USS Lindsey

Darol Charles Brown

On March 27, 1924, Darol C. Brown was born in the Sturgis area. His parents were Charles Oscar Brown and Gladys Lavetta Grant. Before he entered the service, Darol was living in Fairburn in Pennington County. He entered the Navy from Washington and, in fact, gave Carbonado, Washington, as his home address. On the link for “Garden of Remembrance,” http://www.historylink.org/wardead/ww2/ww2-b.htm,

Darol Brown is listed on this “honor roll of Washington state citizens who gave their lives during WW II and subsequent military conflicts.”

In 1944, Darol started his military career as an Apprentice Seaman at the Navy Recruiting Station. A few days later he was transferred to a Naval Training Station at Camp Farragut in Idaho. On August 20, 1944, Seaman Second Class Brown was transferred on board the USS Lindsey. The USS Lindsey was originally designed as a destroyer but then was fitted to be a “2200-ton Robert H. Smith class light minelayer.” On August 21, 1944, Brown embarked for foreign service.

During the Okinawa campaign, the USS Lindsey was hit by two kamikaze planes, and the damage killed nearly sixty crewmembers, destroying the Lindsey’s bow. Darol C. Brown was one of the 60 killed that day. He was lost at sea and presumed dead, then later was declared killed in action. He is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial in Hawaii.

Darol C. Brown was one of the brave young men who fought for our country. He received the Purple Heart Medal, an honor only awarded to those who are wounded or killed in action. Let us not forget this brave young sailor.

Respectfully submitted by Kevin LaHood-Burns and Ben Cook, 8th graders at St. Elizabeth Seton School, Rapid City, SD.  March 27, 2002.  Information for this entry was provided by an application for a SD veteran’s bonus application, Service Record Book: Lead and Community, http://www.history.navy.mil/, and http://www.historylink.org/wardead/ww2/ww2-b.htm.